Are You Worth It?


Do you remember the hair color campaign: “Because I’m worth It.”?
Loreal sold a lot of hair color with that phrase. Supposedly, the women in the ad used Loreal because, when it came to taking care of themselves, nothing else would do—they deserved Loreal.
Many very successful and accomplished women struggle with the concept of deserving. Their self-care, their wellbeing, and even their waistlines often pay a big price.
Are you making do?
Many women sell themselves short because they are living a belief that doing a good job and being a good person means putting themselves last. They are trapped in a common high-achievers mindset mistake—the belief that success comes from working harder and harder, giving more and more, and pushing your own needs aside so you can focus on the mission at hand.
When you are stuck in this mindset, everything and everyone else comes first and you are supposed to thriftily make do with what’s left over. I know a lot of women who have elevated this ability to a science. I know some who are even proud of it. They can multitask, bargain shop, and survive on very little sleep. They are the ones who make it happen for everyone else and then they make do for themselves. Some have been doing it for so long, they can’t imagine doing it another way.
Have you sent yourself to the bargain basement instead of living a life of worth?
Do you always shop for yourself on the bargain rack (and not so much for everyone else)?
Do your events go on the calendar “only if it works out” between everyone else’s’ schedules?
Do you give yourself substitutes for what you really crave? A great example of this is overeating or using food as a quick and easy reward or substitute for a real indulgence.
Are you the one who eats the broken cookie, takes the burnt piece, or uses the chipped cup when there aren’t enough to go around?
Do you feel like you have to justify or explain or “earn” special things that you might do for yourself?
It’s time to start living a new story.
The truth is, you were born enough. We all were. And when the resources get passed out—the time, the energy, the money, the hours of sleep and downtime—you deserve the same amount as everyone else.
Deserving isn’t something you earn or achieve by eating or being or working a certain way. True, we can’t all have everything. But we can shine our generous caring spirit on ourselves the same way we shine it on the rest of the world.
Try saying it out loud. “I’m worth it.” “I am deserving.” “I am enough.”
How does it feel?
My challenge to you:
Take a few days to notice where you might be making do instead of owning or asking for what you want or need. How does owning your worth have the potential to change your life?
Take good care,

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